First Aid Guide

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Mar 20, 2018
20
131
Hey all! I notice that this community is divided (in a benevolent way) and it got me thinking. Some people here do plan on leaving very soon and have plans or are planning things out. However, there are people like me, who don't really have a plan for their own reasons but understand the sentiment. For those who don't plan on leaving soon, I noticed that there is some drug use, alcohol use and most commonly, self harm. I monitor my marijuana and alcohol intake but sometimes, cutting can become unpredictable. Here's a guide that I put together using my own personal experience and certification in first aid.

  1. It's OK to have a a cutting kit.
    I'm not here to encourage cutting but if you make the decision to, it's best to be prepared beforehand. My "kit" is a small jewelry box with band-aids, gauze, anti-bacterial cream and medical tape in addition to a bottle of rubbing alcohol and paper towels. All of these things can be bought at your local pharmacy. Please don't use cotton on deep cuts because the fibers can lodge in there and irritate the wound.
  2. Create a routine.
    I get it, sometimes, you do it on a whim and you need to just cut but when you can, follow a routine. The routine I recommend is to lay out your gauze and band-aids first. Uncap your tube of anti-bacterial cream and open your bottle of rubbing alcohol. Wet your paper towel with the rubbing alcohol so that as soon as you cut, you can immediately press it against the fresh cut. As you leave the paper towel on your wound to soak up the blood, put some of the anti-bacterial cream on your gauze/band-aids and then you can cover up your cut. Clean up/pack up everything into your kit after taking care of your cut.
  3. Too deep? Don't worry.
    Sometimes, the cut is deeper than you intended and there's more blood than you expected. First thing you should do is stop the bleeding. A paper towel or a hand towel will work just fine. Press it against the wound firmly until the bleeding slows down. Here's the scary part but don't worry: pull apart the flesh around the cut ever so slightly to see how deep it is. Don't go digging in there. Just take a slight peek and try not to keep it open for too long. This time, don't put the anti-bacterial cream on the band aid; squeeze it directly into the cut after you wipe it down with rubbing alcohol. Put on the gauze/band-aid as usual but try not to move the wounded area too much.
  4. Still too deep? Keep calm.
    Sometimes, your cut will not close because it is too deep and too long. Again, press a towel against it until the blood flow slows down. Directly apply the anti-bacterial cream and from here, when you apply the band aids, put them on sideways to keep the wound closed. Use as many as you need to cover the length of the cut. Since the adhesive won't hold it for too long, wrap the gauze around your arm/leg snugly. As it heals, it will do so as if it's not a a gaping wound.
  5. Checking the color of the scabs.
    Every cut, intentional or not, will scab over. Once your cut scabs over, it doesn't mean your job to keep it clean is over. Check for any yellow pus oozing out. If this happens, it means that your cut is infected. In this case, wet a towel with warm water and lay it on the infected cut. Let it sit there for a while and the scab will soften. Take some clean tweezers (you can also use your fingers but I find that using tweezers are more effective) and peel away all the yellow pus. If the cut is completely infected, you will have to reopen your wound. Carefully peel away the soft scabs then clean it and bandage up as usual.
If there is something I left out or you have any questions, please comment and I will answer. Hopefully, this helps you guys and your cuts attended to properly.
 
Mar 20, 2018
20
131
If you reach fat, it's reccomended to get stitches to lower infection risk. If you're unable to do that, steristrips can help keep the wound closed, make sure to clean it first though.
I'm going to make a separate post soon about giving yourself stitches because it's quite intense and I want to make sure I put everything down step by step for safety's sake.
 

Mad

Actually just sad
Mar 21, 2018
155
472
Thank you for posting this, the reason why we support free choice is so people can gain access to more peaceful alternatives instead of relying on outdated, agonizing, unwanted methods. A guide to safe self-harming or other coping mechanisms which you definitely don't want to fuck up (like accidentally cutting a tendon) seems morally consistence with the sites founding philosophy.
 
Mar 20, 2018
20
131
Thank you for posting this, the reason why we support free choice is so people can gain access to more peaceful alternatives instead of relying on outdated, agonizing, unwanted methods. A guide to safe self-harming or other coping mechanisms which you definitely don't want to fuck up (like accidentally cutting a tendon) seems morally consistence with the sites founding philosophy.
No prob! I personally don't plan on leaving soon because I want to keep my baby brother happy but I have to do something with all this anxiety and grief so I cut. Another thing is preventing infection, not only for one's safety, but to avoid going to the hospital. Yes, they will treat it but they will also put you in the psych ward and honestly, from my experience, those are stressful af.
 

LetRavensGather

New Member
Apr 13, 2018
4
10
Other signs of infection can include warm to touch, red streaks, and foul odor. I also second observing wound frequently for oozing or pus. As with the other poster said, reaching fatty tissue is an indicator for sutures. The best way I know to describe that is when you go far enough done to see yellowish tissue.
 

Sharethepain

We forge the chains we wear in life.
May 2, 2018
138
531
Is there a danger to damage your tendons or muscles when cutting?

I don't really know what's inside my wrists and how easily stuff breaks. Apparently not usually, but I'm good at screwing things up, and tend to use too much force on everything.

(I hope I'm not the only one stupid enough to ask this)
If you cut vertically there is a really low chance of that happening, if you cut horizontally and deep enough, especially near your wrist area ( the place connecting to your hand, or palm, you get the idea) then there is a possibility you could sever muscle or nerve tissue which could result in permament damage.
 

Phantom

Member
Apr 9, 2018
29
101
If you cut vertically there is a really low chance of that happening, if you cut horizontally and deep enough, especially near your wrist area ( the place connecting to your hand, or palm, you get the idea) then there is a possibility you could sever muscle or nerve tissue which could result in permament damage.
Isn't vertical cut (along the arm) on the other hand the one which causes more bleeding, as it'll probably be a longer cut?
(Maybe cutting isn't for me, or self harm overall. I just really need a way to vent by myself and on myself)
 

Sharethepain

We forge the chains we wear in life.
May 2, 2018
138
531
Isn't vertical cut (along the arm) on the other hand the one which causes more bleeding, as it'll probably be a longer cut?
(Maybe cutting isn't for me, or self harm overall. I just really need a way to vent by myself and on myself)
Well it depends on how deep you cut, it usually causes more bleeding that is true, because of the length. If you were to cut vertically and horizontally each for about 2-3 centimeters and not deep enough the bleeding would be the same. The difference is, vertical cuts can open the artery which would result in massive bleeding, i suppose horizontal could as well but it would not be so severe because of the length. So basically - vertical cuts = more blood and less worries about permament damage ( if we are talking about deep cuts ) , horizontal cuts - less blood because of the length of the cut and a chance to sever something if cut is deep enough. Hope this makes sense.
 

Phantom

Member
Apr 9, 2018
29
101
Well it depends on how deep you cut, it usually causes more bleeding that is true, because of the length. If you were to cut vertically and horizontally each for about 2-3 centimeters and not deep enough the bleeding would be the same. The difference is, vertical cuts can open the artery which would result in massive bleeding, i suppose horizontal could as well but it would not be so severe because of the length. So basically - vertical cuts = more blood and less worries about permament damage ( if we are talking about deep cuts ) , horizontal cuts - less blood because of the length of the cut and a chance to sever something if cut is deep enough. Hope this makes sense.
I think I got it
 
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Cat

Member
Jun 21, 2018
16
23
Hmm, stitching seems like big annoyance... Do you think that deeper but smaller wound would be safer for self harm? Of course not too deep to puncture anything important (at least while I still want to stay alive). But in general, how small do you think one should keep it to avoid stitching?
 
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chronicpainnomore

Not Circling the Drain Anymore
May 31, 2018
312
1,241
Hmm, stitching seems like big annoyance... Do you think that deeper but smaller wound would be safer for self harm? Of course not too deep to puncture anything important (at least while I still want to stay alive). But in general, how small do you think one should keep it to avoid stitching?
Former surgical assistant here. No, deeper is usually not better. The deeper the wound, the greater the chance of infection and more chance of damaging things further down. Nerves, veins, arteries, etc.

And to answer your question about size: It's hard to put an exact number on it. The key to all wounds is approximation. That is, bringing the sides of the wounds together. When determining how many stitches a wound gets, it's not about the size of the wounds, it's about bringing the sides of the wound close enough together to allow healing. So when you're making a wound, look at it and see how "gaping" it is. Does it close easily? That's what determines what help it's going to need to stay closed (stitches, glue, etc.)
 

Cat

Member
Jun 21, 2018
16
23
Thanks, that helps. Guess I should study anatomy... One more quick question though, for more fatty places, does fat layer protect all important stuff, or are there still some important veins/arteries above it?
 

RaptorHavx

Drowning in loneliness...
Aug 15, 2018
120
339
Well, some veins are very shallow, for example on upper side of your foot, there is no fat layer there. Just a 2-3mm cut and it's getting very messy. I've tried... that was really bad idea. From shock I've nearly fainted.
 
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DeletedUser4739

Guest
I'm too squeamish for cutting and didn't know it until I read this. For anyone who is into it, you have done an excellent job of describing what to do.