Could I get this person(s) in some sort of legal trouble?

Stepheng7287

Stepheng7287

Faster We Run, And We Die Young
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So before I go I plan on donating the rest of my savings to a couple of YouTubers I've been watching for the last few years. They're in a shitty country (economy wise) and I'd like for my money to go to them as their videos have helped me through a lot over the last few years and it would actually mean something to them as they earn F all. Only problem is I'm still living with my parents (I'm 24) and I don't want them nosey-ing in my business after I'm gone and seeing I donated my money to a random person overseas. That could make them think I was pressured into giving my money to this person and I don't want these guys getting in some legal trouble or some shit. Could this actually get them in trouble or would my parents not actually have access to my bank account activity? I'm thinking because it's a suicide that they would.

I'll be donating through PayPal if that matters.

Oh, and I'll be leaving some money behind for my funeral and whatnot (I'm guessing €5k would be enough)
 
X

Xali1970

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Go to lawyer and make a will laying out your wishes.
At least if you change your mind, back out or don't succeed you won't have lost your money. Disputing a will through the courts can be done, but unless you have a few hundred thousand €$ isn't worth the trouble and expense.
As for legal trouble... if they live in a 'shitty country' they have other worries. Unless your parents have evidence these youtubers influenced your ctb by design or pressured you no law enforcement agency will bother with an international investigation.
Suing those guys through civil courts in a foreign country is pointless. It's a very expensive proposition for little to no return.
 
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A

Aap

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once the money is transferred through PayPal and withdrawn on their end, there is not really any recourse. Even before the money is withdrawn on their end, unless your parents (falsely) claimed fraud, they wouldn’t have grounds (and also shouldn’t have access to PayPal) to dispute it. If they went to the bank immediately after death and before the money had cleared on your end to PayPal, they conceivably could convince the bank the initial transfer was fraudulent.

honestly, I don’t think the initial thought of your parents would be to run to the bank to clear out your account. You may or may not want to mention the transfer in your note. Pros: your parents know and don’t assume you were scammed and decided to kill your self. Cons: parents immediately decide to go to the bank and create issues.

the poorer the country you are sending money to, the less likely it is they will have legal issues, unless it is an extremely closed country that won’t allow the incoming transfers. If they have a PayPal account, it sounds like that is not an issue.
 
Stepheng7287

Stepheng7287

Faster We Run, And We Die Young
Joined
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125
Go to lawyer and make a will laying out your wishes.
At least if you change your mind, back out or don't succeed you won't have lost your money. Disputing a will through the courts can be done, but unless you have a few hundred thousand €$ isn't worth the trouble and expense.
As for legal trouble... if they live in a 'shitty country' they have other worries. Unless your parents have evidence these youtubers influenced your ctb by design or pressured you no law enforcement agency will bother with an international investigation.
Suing those guys through civil courts in a foreign country is pointless. It's a very expensive proposition for little to no return.
What are the "other worries" you're talking about? It's a country in Europe but not part of the EU. It's a great country just with shitty wages. It's not Syria or anything ;)
My main worry is my parents thinking I was pressured into giving the money to them and bothering them even in the slightest. Even if they can't sue them I'd still worry about them asking questions. I'd rather if they couldn't see my account activity at all. Will the bank even be able to show them my statements?
 
J

Jean Améry

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I second @Xali1970. Don't donate as this means you'll have lost all your savings if for some reason you decide not to CTB or it fails.

Drawing up a will is the way to go. No-one here can advise you on that as it depends on the legal system that applies to you and you'll need the help of a legal professional anyway to ensure it's valid.

As to any 'legal trouble': if there's no hint of any pressure (undue influence) or any involvment in your CTB I don't see how there could be any. Still if you want to be sure enlist the help of a legal professional. If you pay them they should have a duty of confidentiality.
 
yetme

yetme

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What are the "other worries" you're talking about? It's a country in Europe but not part of the EU. It's a great country just with shitty wages. It's not Syria or anything ;)
My main worry is my parents thinking I was pressured into giving the money to them and bothering them even in the slightest. Even if they can't sue them I'd still worry about them asking questions. I'd rather if they couldn't see my account activity at all. Will the bank even be able to show them my statements?
use bitcoin to avoid any legal trace. it's also better for the other side, 'cause paypal could be restricted in other countries.
 
N

NeverGoodEnuff

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Being not familiar with international banking law, I don't know if this could work?

1. Go to your bank and withdraw cash.

2. Go to a different bank where you do not have an account and purchase a cashier's check with the cash.

3. Mail or FedEx the check to whomever you want to have it.

Your bank statements will show just a cash withdrawal. The only record of the cashier's check will be your receipt for it and you could destroy that after the recipient cashes the check.

Would this work?

I do agree with others to wait and put it in your will.
 
Stepheng7287

Stepheng7287

Faster We Run, And We Die Young
Joined
Aug 29, 2020
Messages
125
I second @Xali1970. Don't donate as this means you'll have lost all your savings if for some reason you decide not to CTB or it fails.

Drawing up a will is the way to go. No-one here can advise you on that as it depends on the legal system that applies to you and you'll need the help of a legal professional anyway to ensure it's valid.

As to any 'legal trouble': if there's no hint of any pressure (undue influence) or any involvment in your CTB I don't see how there could be any. Still if you want to be sure enlist the help of a legal professional. If you pay them they should have a duty of confidentiality.
Won't there be questions asked when a healthy looking 24 year old is looking to write up a will? You obviously can't tell him you're suicidal or hell
I second @Xali1970. Don't donate as this means you'll have lost all your savings if for some reason you decide not to CTB or it fails.

Drawing up a will is the way to go. No-one here can advise you on that as it depends on the legal system that applies to you and you'll need the help of a legal professional anyway to ensure it's valid.

As to any 'legal trouble': if there's no hint of any pressure (undue influence) or any involvment in your CTB I don't see how there could be any. Still if you want to be sure enlist the help of a legal professional. If you pay them they should have a duty of confidentiality.
Won't there be questions asked when a healthy looking 24 year old is looking to write up a will? You can't tell them you're suicidal or they'll report you. They'll definitely catch on to what you're doing at some point.
 
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Jean Améry

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Won't there be questions asked when a healthy looking 24 year old is looking to write up a will?
Why? A notary or a lawyer isn't a 'mental health professional' and it's their job to render this kind of service not to mention they get paid for it. Why on earth would they have any incentive to inquire about the motive? I've never heard of anyone having to justify why they want to compose a will nor of any legal requirement to do so. It's any adult's right, at least when they're legally competent.
 

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